E-mail

How to configure your mail-client. ANY mail-client.

If you are a cpanel user, different settings apply!

Incoming mail:
POP3, incoming mailserver: mail.oznb.net port: 995
security on SSL/TLS Normal login/password

IMAP, incoming mailserver: mail.oznb.net port: 993
security on SSL/TLS Normal login/password

Outgoing mail:
SMTP, outgoing mailserver: mail.oznb.net port: 587
security on TLS Normal login/password
username + password of your mail account.

Every single e-mail client looks different, works a little different, but they
all require the same settings. There are no exceptions.

We have tested just about all popular, and some not so popular but very cool
e-mail clients. We still haven’t found an exception that could deny
our achievement “compatible for all mail-clients”. This achievement was worth
a hefty 20 OZNB points to us.

RECOMMENDATIONS:

“You are in control!”

If you have a choice, pick an e-mail client you like. It sounds silly, but it is something
that a lot of people forget. There are a lot of mail-clients and all have their good and
evil sides.

“To POP, or not to POP3”

There is more on this earth than POP3 .. yes, there is. And especially when you
are using a mobile phone, we suggest that you use IMAP. The main difference
between the two of these protocols is that IMAP is designed to leave the mail on
the mail-server. POP3 is designed to fetch the mail, and than remove it from the
server when it’s stored locally on your computer (or phone).
Leave the mail on the server if you use more than one client (think home-computer
and mobile/smartphone).. because once it’s on one of your computers/phones it will
by normal behaviour be removed from our servers.
And if that is what you are looking for, please, by all means.

“How many times do you check your mailbox at home?”

How many times do you walk to your front door to check if you have received your
snail/old/paper-mail?
Once, because the postman only delivers once a day? Good!
Apply the same logic to your e-mail, and you realize immediatly that you don’t
receive e-mail every minute of the day.
That said, it can be delivered any minute of the day.

But checking every other minute or every other 5 minutes seems silly to us. It
interrupts the flow of your workday (the *pling* or “you’ve got mail” notification).

Especially for mobile phones we strongly advice you NOT to let the mail.app or any
other mail programma check more than once every 30 minutes. It hurts your
batterylife so much you will be recharing your phone twice a day. And as bandwidth
is often not within a FUP policy, chances are you will be paying extra for this
behaviour.

Be sensible, and preserve your battery for making phone-calls!

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